PICCing up Steam, Part 2: A snapshot of home infusion

Every two weeks, a large box of PICC infusion goodies is shipped to me overnight. It contains everything I need to do my home infusions, and everything the visiting nurse needs for my weekly dressing changes.

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Saline, and heparin, and rocephin – OH MY!

The rocephin needs to be stored frozen, and thawed before use. I infuse five night per week. Each infusion night, I take a rocephin dose out of the fridge to use, and put a frozen one in its place to thaw for the next day.

Then I gather my supplies:

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Gloves, alcohol wipes, meds, and line care syringes

I attach a saline syringe to my line, pull back to check for blood return, and flush the line with saline. Then I attach the roundish balloon-y thing (<- technical & scientific term!) of rocephin to my line. And here’s the really cool part…

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There is no need for an IV pole, or help from gravity to infuse my medicine! The medicine is pressure backed into the balloon, and propels itself through my line. The speed is regulated by a very small gauge tube which connect the extension on my PICC line. I can put the balloon in my pocket, or drape the line around my neck and be completely mobile while infusing. This is especially nice because it takes about an hour for all the meds to infuse. At the end, I flush the line again with saline and heparin, and I’m all done.

On days I don’t infuse, I simply flush my line with a heparin syringe to keep it free of clots.  At first, it was a little stressful doing these infusions on my own. I would forget to clamp or unclamp my line, or shoot saline across the room when trying to squeeze out the bubbles, or worry that I was somehow doing something wrong. But with time, it’s gotten very easy, and I can complete the whole process without too much thought or stress.

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